Traditional Christmas Dishes

Nothing spells Christmas quite like the food that we consume on that most global of holidays. Depending on what is served up on the table, you can tell where you are, and in some cases when you are. But in all seriousness, let’s have a look-see at some of the famous and traditional Christmas dishes from around the world.

United States – Christmas Ham

If you ask an American what food they equate with Christmas, the reflexive response of ‘Christmas Ham’ comes out. He might not even know what Christmas Ham is, but that didn’t stop him from saying it. They say Christmas Ham comes from early German people, but today the tubular roast is a common sighting among many a Christmas feast in the USA, right there beside the apple pie.

United States – Christmas Ham

Credits to yummly.com

England – Christmas Pudding

Also known as “plum pudding”, this traditional English dish that comes from the medieval ages doesn’t actually have plums in it. The word actually once referred to the raisins that you’ll find within the pudding cake alongside other dried fruits. It’s all set up in an egg-molasses mixture and spiced cinnamon and clove to make a truly tasty treat.

England – Christmas Pudding

Credits to thetalentzone.co.uk

Belgium – Cougnou

On Christmastime in the Low Countries, you can expect to see a curious sight on family tables. It’s a sweet bread loaf that has been baked up in the form of baby Jesus. Its composition is not much different from other sweet breads, but it does have raisins, and you are supposed to consume it with a hot cup of chocolate.

Belgium – Cougnou homemade

Credits to www.yumsugar.com

Canada – Gingerbread House

Although gingerbread originated in Europe, and though it’s very popular in the US as well, we’ll give this one to Canada, where it is also widely eaten at Christmas time. Using gingerbread as bricks and frosting as mortar to create little houses is a popular Christmas pastime. Another common use of gingerbread is the little men with fire red button down their fronts—you know what we’ve talking about.

Canada – Gingerbread House homemade

Credits to ourworldwideclassroom.blogspot.com

Chile – Pan de Pascua

With 40% of Catholics living in Latin America, we have to address that region, and there’s no better Christmas dish to mention than Chile’s version of sponge cake. At Christmas, stores will be stockpiled with pre-fab pan de pascuas, but it’s common for Chilean families to bake their own. All it takes is honey, ginger, nuts, raisins, flour, sugar and eggs.

Chile – Pan de Pascua homemade

Credits to canelakitchen.blogspot.com

Philippines – Puto

The steamed rice cake can be found all over the country year-round, but it is also something that is inseparable from a conversation on traditional Christmas dishes in the Philippines. Made in bamboo steamer baskets, the desert takes a skilled hand to yield. Locals eat these delectable round balls with grated coconut or butter.

Philippines – Puto homemade

Credits to www.jobostonisafoodie.com

Japan – KFC

Here’s an interesting case. The one percent of Japanese who celebrate Christmas are known to head out on Christmas day to claim their bucket of fried chicken from this popular American fast food chain. It might not be the most organic tradition, but having begun thanks to a marketing campaign in ’74 that targeted foreigners who couldn’t find turkey, it at least warrants the title of custom.

Japan – KFC xmas

 Credits to www.tofugu.com

 

comments